Tag Archives: trucks

Motion…

The drive out to Long Island to retrieve one college student has not returned any high scores today, not for best mileage (scroll down) or worst, not for best transit time (40 minutes) or worst (5 hours in the Dakota, rarely getting beyond 1st gear) though 2.5 hours is far longer than this trip should require.  But it’s great to see the kid, and the hours of Long Island traffic will never deter me from dropping everything to bring her home for the weekend.

When I arrived, Felicia was at work on her laptop. I’m ever amused by her  laptop’s screen backgrounds, usually featuring some favorite anime or graphic novel art, such as the image below. She’s informed me that  in the last week (even while taking 18 credits, working one job on campus and an internship at Marvel) she’s read 13 graphic novels. I blame her parents, that’s what we get for raising a kid on Starblazers,  Moonknight and vintage X-men comics.  I’d worry if her grades were suffering, but she’s been on the Dean’s list throughout her time in college. I’ve already asked her to throw me a few graphic novels she’s finished. I’ll admit, it’s her screen background from Runaways, the series she’s currently immersed in, that caught my attention.

Go figure. Yes, the subject matter all makes me smile.  I love the way this image so perfectly captures the energy and motion of the moment.  And for those who don’t know the series,  not to worry.  The duckies will be fine as will the little girl leaping to their aid. The same can’t be said for the lovely red semi.

(This blog slightly cuts off the image. For the full image, click HERE.)

Pain at the pump… part II

This is where I was headed with the previous post. The point I’m trying to make is while some people whine about the price of fuel for their personal vehicles, it’s those who drive for a living taking the hardest hit.

From: http://www.wnbc.com/news/15762598/detail.html

At a New Jersey Turnpike rest area in North Jersey, about 200 truck drivers carried signs and protested high fuel prices.”The gas prices are too high,” said one of them, Lamont Newberne, a 34-year-old trucker from Wilmington, N.C. “We don’t make enough money to pay our bills and take care of our family.”Newberne said a typical run carrying produce from Lakeland, Fla., to the Hunt’s Point Market in The Bronx, N.Y., had cost $600 to $700 a year ago. It now runs him $1,000.Using CB radios and trucking Web sites, some truckers called for a strike Tuesday to protest the high cost of diesel fuel, hoping the action might pressure President Bush to stabilize prices by using the nation’s oil reserves.”The gas prices are too high,” said Lamont Newberne, a trucker from Wilmington, N.C., who along with 200 drivers protested at a New Jersey Turnpike service area. “We don’t make enough money to pay our bills and take care of our family.”On the Turnpike, southbound rigs “as far as the eye can see” staged a short lunchtime protest by moving about 20 mph near Newark, jamming traffic on one of the nation’s most heavily traveled highways, authorities said.By day’s end, the protests ended up scattered; Major trucking companies were not on board, and Teamsters union officials and the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association denied organizing the protests.Federal law prohibits the association from calling for a strike because it is a trade association.Meanwhile in Washington, top executives of the five biggest U.S. oil companies said they know high prices are hurting consumers but deflected any blame and argued their profits — $123 billion last year — were in line with other industries.Clayton Boyce, spokesman for the American Trucking Association, said diesel prices are the worst he’s seen but said his organization does not support or condone the strike.His group is pushing for a number of measures to keep the prices down or to otherwise help truckers, including allowing exploration of oil-rich areas of the U.S. that are now off limits and setting a 65 mph national speed limit.Newberne said a typical run carrying produce from Lakeland, Fla., to the Hunt’s Point Market in The Bronx, N.Y., had cost $600 to $700 a year ago. It now runs him $1,000.Outside Chicago, three truck drivers were ticketed for impeding traffic on Interstate 55, driving three abreast at low speeds, the state police said. About 30 truckers drove in a convoy around metropolitan Atlanta at low speeds, police said.Near Florida’s Port of Tampa, more than 50 tractor-trailer rigs sat idle as their drivers demanded that contractors pay them more to cover their fuel and other costs.”We can no longer haul their stuff for what they’re paying,” said David Santiago, 35, a trucker for the past 17 years.Charles Rotenbarger, 49, a trucker from Columbus, Ohio, said he felt helpless.”The oil company is the boss, what are we going to be able to do about it?” said Rotenbarger, who was at a truck stop at Baldwin, Fla., about 20 miles west of Jacksonville. “The whole world economy is going to be controlled by the oil companies. There’s nothing we can do about it.”Jimmy Lowry, 51, of St. Petersburg, Fla., and others said it costs about $1 a mile to drive one of the big rigs, although some companies are offering as little as 87 cents a mile. Diesel cost $4.03 a gallon at the truck stop.Rather than join the protests, some truckers were forced to sit idle because of shippers’ fears of a possible strike.In western Michigan, independent trucker William Gentry had been scheduled to pick up a load and take it to Boston, but his dispatcher told him there was a change of plans.”She told me that her shipper was shutting down,” fearing that someone would sabotage deliveries if their drivers worked during the protest, Gentry said at the Tulip City Truck Stop outside Holland, Mich.He and Bob Sizemore, 55, a 30-year veteran trucker, decided to return to their homes in Ohio, 280-mile trips that would cost each one about $200 of their own money for fuel alone.”We can’t ride around here looking for freight,” said Gentry, 47, a driver for 23 years.If something isn’t done about fuel prices, the cost of consumer goods will shoot up, Gentry said. “People aren’t seeing that the more we pay, the more they’re going to pay.”

Pain at the pump…

Every time I hear someone whining over how much it costs these days to fill the ol’ Ford Valdez, I really want to scream.. Somehow, I really can’t feel overwhelming sympathy for someone who insists the need to drive some oversized land-barge just to shuttle the kiddies to soccer… oh, I know, “It’s safer.” Yeah, right. Something that rolls over at the thought of a sudden lane change… real safe. It aggravates me, when you could just as well drive around in some reasonable sedan or even a cool little Mini Cooper. My one neighbor has three kids, and she’s driven the Cooper for years. Most people can drive something smaller and more efficient, or better yet, take mass transit. That is, unless you drive, say, a Kenworth or the like.

Think about that, while the oil companies make record profits. Then read this…

http://www.landlinemag.com/todays_news/Daily/2008/Apr08/040108/033108-01.htm

For more information, just take a look here…

http://www.ooida.com